U.S. Marines – United States Marine Corps

Brothers in the Corps

When Warren Peugh returned home from boot camp at San Diego, Calif., he expected to meet with his two brothers and tell them all about his experience. When he got home he was surprised to find that they were in the Marine Corps Delayed Entry program awaiting to attend boot camp themselves.

Lance Corporal Warren Peugh (middle), his younger brother, Chris -- also a lance corporal (first), and Edward (a corporal, last) are by all rights -- as the saying goes -- a ‘band of brothers.’ Their one commonality is a membership to the smallest military service in the U.S. But their differences brought them to three separate corners of that service to serve the Corps in the office, in the air and on the ground.

Lance Corporal Warren Peugh (middle), his younger brother, Chris — also a lance corporal (first), and Edward (a corporal, last) are by all rights — as the saying goes — a ‘band of brothers.’ Their one commonality is a membership to the smallest military service in the U.S. But their differences brought them to three separate corners of that service to serve the Corps in the office, in the air and on the ground.

The three Marines, who hail from Cerritos, Calif., have very different jobs. But no matter where they are, or what they do, their jobs all support the Global War on Terrorism.

Lance Cpl. Warren Peugh, his younger brother, Chris — also a lance corporal, and Edward (a corporal) are by all rights — as the saying goes — a ‘band of brothers.’ Their one commonality is a membership to the smallest military service in the U.S.; but their differences brought them to three separate corners of that brotherhood to serve the Corps in the office, in the air and on the ground.

“When I shipped out, I guess they thought it was a good idea to follow suit,” said Warren. “After all, we’re all Eagle Scouts as well.”

Warren is a 24-year-old Nuclear Biological Chemical specialist with the 2nd Marine Division – a ground combat unit serving in the Al Anbar Province of Iraq. He is also a sentry on the camp’s guard force and a common operational picture manager, updating intelligence reports and information from troops in the field for the division’s combat operations center. His unit is supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom, here in western Iraq.

“I love NBC when I get the chance to do my job,” said the 1998 Ghar High School graduate. “To train us, we were put in a chamber with actual Sarin and VX nerve gasses. We had to assess where the gas came from and contain the site. It was dangerous, but it gave us the confidence to do our jobs.”


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