U.S. Marines – United States Marine Corps

PA Poolees Get a Taste of Boot Camp

At  the end of the competition, the future Marines were given a Meal Ready  to Eat (MRE), another facet of preparing them for Marine Recruit  Training. They were shown how to open and prepare their meals and with  skeptical faces but hungry stomachs, they wasted no time in testing out  the Marine Corps? cornucopia of culinary delights. Approximately 400  future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for  Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The  purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp  and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.

At the end of the competition, the future Marines were given a Meal Ready to Eat (MRE), another facet of preparing them for Marine Recruit Training. They were shown how to open and prepare their meals and with skeptical faces but hungry stomachs, they wasted no time in testing out the Marine Corps? cornucopia of culinary delights. Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.

Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg’s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The event is a series of physically and mentally challenging obstacles similar to those found in Recruit Training. The purpose is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.

A Marine drill instructor greeted the soon-to-be Marine’s as they exited the busses. The drill instructor then gave them detailed instructions in forming a platoon size formation and keeping their mouths shut.

“I thought it was a good head start for the poolees, said Sgt. Paul Nixon, drill instructor, Company I, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. “It tested them physically and mentally and allowed them to display teamwork and camaraderie.”

After the initial shock of a drill instructor greeting, the young men and women were divided into three groups of 10 teams with 10 to 13 poolees on each team.

Following the obstacle course, a Marine Corps martial arts  demonstration took place coupled with knee and elbow-bag drills.  Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian  Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine  Challenge. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines  with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and  camaraderie.

Following the obstacle course, a Marine Corps martial arts demonstration took place coupled with knee and elbow-bag drills. Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.

The day’s events were broken into three main categories; the Leadership Reaction Course (LRC), field skills, and an enhanced Initial Strength Test (IST).

“We broke all the poolees into three groups of approximately 125 each to keep everyone moving at all times,” said Gunnery Sgt. Derrick B. Jones, program specialist, RS Harrisburg. “We wanted everyone to feel the rigorous physical demand needed to complete recruit training.”

After a safety brief given by Maj. Kurt Mogensen, RS Harrisburg’s Commanding Officer, each group was then directed to one of the three main event areas for the day to begin.

The LRC consisted of 10 mentally and physically demanding problem solving cells. In each cell, the teams were presented a problem, and given 10 minutes to solve it. Problems ranged from transporting a casualty across a cable bridge to creating and crossing a bridge while carrying all equipment needed for the exercise.

“We wanted this event to stress two very important things they will need to successfully complete recruit training; physical fitness and teamwork,” said Jones. “Each team had to quickly decide a game plan and then try to work together to complete each problem in the given amount of time.”

The field skills area consisted of running through a timed obstacle course where teams had to run through several simulated barbed-wire obstacles, tunnels, and traverse through muddy terrain while simulating casualty evacuation along the way.

“Marines take care of their own,” said Sgt. David Watson, supply noncommissioned officer, RS Harrisburg, who designed the course. “We wanted to instill a sense of responsibility and loyalty to their fellow team members.”

Brandy Bross, a Recruiting Substation Bucks County poolee, executes  a hip throw during the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program demonstration.  Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian  Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine  Challenge. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines  with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and  camaraderie. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future  Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and  camaraderie.

Brandy Bross, a Recruiting Substation Bucks County poolee, executes a hip throw during the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program demonstration. Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.

After the obstacle course, a Marine Corps martial arts demonstration took place coupled with knee and elbow-bag drills.

“The martial arts demonstration and the IST were some of the best aspects for them, said Nixon. “Today’s recruits arriving at Parris Island have the hardest time with the physical aspects of recruit training; these events can help ease that burden.”

For the IST each team’s score reflected the effort of everyone.

Each team had two minutes to conduct as many pull-ups and crunches as they could. The run-time for each team was taken when the last poolee crossed the finish line.

“The idea behind the IST portion is to help motivate them to get in shape and build a sense of camaraderie with the other members of the pool,” said Staff Sgt. William Favinger III, staff noncommissioned officer-in-charge, Recruiting Substation Capital City.

At the end of the competition, the future Marines were given a Meal Ready to Eat (MRE). They were shown how to open and prepare their meals and with skeptical faces but hungry stomachs, they wasted no time in testing out the Marine Corps’ cornucopia of culinary delights.
The day concluded with an awards ceremony for the winning teams and the future Marines left the training area.

“Only one team could win, however, all the poolees left the event with first hand experience about what recruit training is like, said Jones. “The recruiters paint a verbal picture for them, but it’s always better to get a real feel for it.”

Dylan Acker, a senior from Dallastown Area High School, York, Pa.,  gets a taste of mud during the obstacle course portion. Acker is one of  many potential applicants who attended the event in the hopes to learn  more about the Marine Corps way of life. Approximately 400 future  Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for  Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The  purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp  and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.

Dylan Acker, a senior from Dallastown Area High School, York, Pa., gets a taste of mud during the obstacle course portion. Acker is one of many potential applicants who attended the event in the hopes to learn more about the Marine Corps way of life. Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.
Each Poolee had the opportunity to practice their leadership skills  during the Leadership Reaction Course (LRC). This course is similar to  the obstacles recruits face during the Crucible and is designed to build  confidence in teamwork and leadership. Approximately 400 future Marines  gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting  Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The purpose of the  event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow  them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.

Each Poolee had the opportunity to practice their leadership skills during the Leadership Reaction Course (LRC). This course is similar to the obstacles recruits face during the Crucible and is designed to build confidence in teamwork and leadership. Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge. The purpose of the event is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.
Senior Drill Instructor Staff Sgt. Patricia A. Wilson, a Buffalo,  N.Y. native, stands tall as she waits for the safety brief to conclude.  Wilson was one of three Marine Corps drill instructors who were invited  to participate in Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Pool Function  May 7. The purpose is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp  and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.

Senior Drill Instructor Staff Sgt. Patricia A. Wilson, a Buffalo, N.Y. native, stands tall as she waits for the safety brief to conclude. Wilson was one of three Marine Corps drill instructors who were invited to participate in Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Pool Function May 7. The purpose is to familiarize the future Marines with boot camp and to allow them to learn about teamwork and camaraderie.
Sergeant Paul Nixon, drill instructor, 3rd Recruit Training  Battalion, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C., gives a  poolee some added incentive to do what he?s told. Approximately 400  future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for  Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge.

Sergeant Paul Nixon, drill instructor, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C., gives a poolee some added incentive to do what he?s told. Approximately 400 future Marines gathered May 7, 2005 at Fort Indian Town Gap, Pa., for Recruiting Station Harrisburg?s Annual Future Marine Challenge.


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