U.S. Marines – United States Marine Corps

Drilling Discipline in Recruits

Discipline is defined at Parris Island as the instant, willing obedience to orders.

Recruits demonstrate their understanding of this trait during the ninth week of recruit training, when platoons face off in a competition called Final Drill.

“Drill is the foundation of discipline,” said Staff Sgt. Jorge Guerrero, the senior drill instructor for Platoon 1012, Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion. “It shows the recruits’ abilities to follow orders no matter the circumstance.”

From the moment recruits arrive on Parris Island, they are taught the basic fundamentals of drill.

Guerrero said there is an overwhelming difference between recruits competing in Initial Drill, their first test of proficiency and Final Drill.

“Their precision and attention to detail has improved a great deal by that time,” said Guerrero, of Harlingen, Texas. “During week nine, the transformation from civilian to Marine is almost complete. You don’t see that during the week of Initial Drill.” (continue reading…)

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Rifle Training – Then and Now

1946 – 1950

Once World War II came to a close, Marine Barracks, Parris Island was renamed Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island in September 1946, according to Eugene Alvarez, a researcher for the Marine Corps Historical Division.

Alvarez writes that along with the name change, women were allowed to return to the Corps on a permanent basis.

President Harry S. Truman signed the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act in 1948, which caused the reactivation of 3rd Recruit Training Battalion for training women Marines, Alvarez writes. (continue reading…)

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Football player trades pads in for flak

After four years of playing offensive tackle on his high school’s football team, he was awarded a full scholarship to attend the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kan., to  play football. Almost two years later, Recruit Bernard D. Lueken, Platoon 3246, Company L, couldn’t continue playing the role of a football player in the spotlight. He had to listen to the voice inside him that urged him to fulfill his desire to become a United States Marine.
When Lueken was a freshman at Chaminade College Preparatory School, Creve Coeur, Miss., he demonstrated a talent for football. Chaminade is a private high school designed for serious students intent on attending college, Lueken said.
“I tried out for the football team as a freshman and was advised by the coach to pursue an athletic career in football,” said Lueken, a St. Louis, Miss., native.
For four years, Lueken held the position of offensive tackle for the Chaminade
Red Devils.
Lueken’s dedication and loyalty can be attributed to his mother, who lost the battle to breast cancer when he was 14 years old. She had strong character and was one of the first women Marines to graduate from bootcamp after it was designed to replicate men’s training, he said. She served six years in the Corps. (continue reading…)
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Fighting to belong

America has traditionally been known around the world as the land of opportunity because of the many immigrants who come to the United States aspiring to a better life.

Some of them join the Armed Forces, which can also accelerate the process of gaining their citizenship and earning  the right to stay.

Erbol Bekmuratov, a recruit with Platoon 2012, Fox Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, and an immigrant from Almaty, Kazakhstan, said he joined the Marine Corps for several reasons.

“I chose the Marines because when I moved here, I heard they were the best this country had, and I wanted to belong to it,” Bekmuratov said.

“I joined because I wanted to earn my citizenship quickly and get money for school once I get out,” Bekmuratov added.

Bekmuratov moved from his country to Philadelphia when he was 16, after his father received a job in the city. Once Bekmuratov was old enough to join the Corps, he spoke with a recruiter.

While citizenship can be a motivating factor to the decision to join the military, other reasons exist as well. (continue reading…)

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Marine recruits take sparring to ring

Recruits practice their Marine Corps Martial Arts skills during the body sparring portion of the Crucible

Two recruits yell at the top of their lungs as they rush into the small wooden ring. Both tired and hungry, they give everything they have left to come out on top.

Body sparring is an event on the Crucible in which recruits put their Marine Corps martial arts moves to use.
The Crucible is a 54-hour training event conducted during Marine Corps Recruit Training at Edson Range, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. It is here where Marine recruits go through simulated combat stress scenarios, which consist of food and sleep deprivation, and overcome mentally and physically-demanding obstacles.
Although recruits are tested daily throughout recruit training, the Crucible is the most anticipated event, where they apply everything they have learned in recruit training up to this point. (continue reading…)
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Marines train with UFC fighters


apt. Craig Schnappinger, right, series commander, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, blocks his face as Staff Sgt. David Gonzalez, martial arts instructor, Company G, 2nd Recruit Training Bn., prepares to use one of the new strikes they were taught by the Victory Fitness Center’s instructors here

Mixed martial artists and the Ultimate Fighting Championship fighters from the Victory Fitness Center, Point Loma, came to Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego’s martial arts satellite school, Oct. 1, to teach servicemembers additional martial arts techniques.

“There are many military members that come to Victory Fitness Center,” said Elias Gallagos, an MMA instructor at the Victory Fitness Center. “I feel that by coming here we are giving back to them.”
Military members and their families who took time to go to the “dojo” learned a few different techniques from three different categories: striking from standing, take downs, and submissions.
“This is an awesome experience,” said Staff Sgt. James McFaline, martial arts instructor, Instructional Training Company, Support Battalion. “It’s a little extra knowledge for our ‘tool belt.’ It builds on what we already know and teaches us additional moves.”
It expands on the Marine Corps’ training, according to Gunnery Sgt. Francisco Galvan, martial arts instructor, ITC, Support Bn. It sparks interest outside of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, and gives a chance to grow as a martial artist. We get a chance to see where the MCMAP techniques originate.”
The instructors and fighters were interested to see each other’s commonalities. “It’s good to learn martial arts and to constantly be a learner,” said Shannon Gugerty, a UFC fighter from the Victory Fitness Center.
“It’s awesome to see that the Marines train the same as we do.”
While the Marines were happy to see the instructors and fighters, the guests seemed more excited that they got to spend time here with servicemembers.
“This is awesome,” said Tony Palafox, an MMA instructor at the Victory Fitness Center. “It’s amazing what we can do to help these guys in any situation, it’s tremendous.”
The guests were allowed to use the dojo’s training equipment before their class started during a mini-lesson from the Marines, according to Palafox.
The techniques that they taught the Marines seemed pretty effective, even in the practice stages, according to Sgt. Charles Roche, a MCMAP Instructor Trainer with ITC.
“The best part about coming here is the after affects,” said Gallegos. “Showing attendees they learned something, and the satisfaction that they know it and can use it to save their lives.”
When the session was over, attendees had more tools for their tool belts, and the instructors and fighters were able to see the results of their training.
“We are honored to come out here and help out our servicemembers,” said Palafox. “There is no speech I can make for it, we are just honored that you let us come here. With the military members being out there protecting us, we like to give back. It makes us feel like we are.”

Mixed martial artists and the Ultimate Fighting Championship fighters from the Victory Fitness Center, Point Loma, came to Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego’s martial arts satellite school, Oct. 1, to teach servicemembers additional martial arts techniques.“There are many military members that come to Victory Fitness Center,” said Elias Gallagos, an MMA instructor at the Victory Fitness Center. “I feel that by coming here we are giving back to them.”

Military members and their families who took time to go to the “dojo” learned a few different techniques from three different categories: striking from standing, take downs, and submissions.

“This is an awesome experience,” said Staff Sgt. James McFaline, martial arts instructor, Instructional Training Company, Support Battalion. “It’s a little extra knowledge for our ‘tool belt.’ It builds on what we already know and teaches us additional moves.”

It expands on the Marine Corps’ training, according to Gunnery Sgt. Francisco Galvan, martial arts instructor, ITC, Support Bn. It sparks interest outside of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, and gives a chance to grow as a martial artist. We get a chance to see where the MCMAP techniques originate.”

The instructors and fighters were interested to see each other’s commonalities. “It’s good to learn martial arts and to constantly be a learner,” said Shannon Gugerty, a UFC fighter from the Victory Fitness Center. “It’s awesome to see that the Marines train the same as we do.”

While the Marines were happy to see the instructors and fighters, the guests seemed more excited that they got to spend time here with servicemembers.

“This is awesome,” said Tony Palafox, an MMA instructor at the Victory Fitness Center. “It’s amazing what we can do to help these guys in any situation, it’s tremendous.”

The guests were allowed to use the dojo’s training equipment before their class started during a mini-lesson from the Marines, according to Palafox.

The techniques that they taught the Marines seemed pretty effective, even in the practice stages, according to Sgt. Charles Roche, a MCMAP Instructor Trainer with ITC.

“The best part about coming here is the after affects,” said Gallegos. “Showing attendees they learned something, and the satisfaction that they know it and can use it to save their lives.”

When the session was over, attendees had more tools for their tool belts, and the instructors and fighters were able to see the results of their training.

“We are honored to come out here and help out our servicemembers,” said Palafox. “There is no speech I can make for it, we are just honored that you let us come here. With the military members being out there protecting us, we like to give back. It makes us feel like we are.”

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Caging the Warrior; Marine martial arts instructors participate in MMA

Robert Abrantes is relaxed, calm and collected. Each stroke is delivered carefully to his canvas. A design unfolds, and as time wears on, the finished product moves into focus. Working like a painter before an easel, Abrantes draws from an array of tools and techniques. However, he doesn’t use brushes and paint. Instead, he uses raw flesh and toned muscle. His blank canvas doesn’t rest on an easel – it’s the body of his opponent.
Sergeant Abrantes, and Staff Sgt. Daniel Sandlin are Martial Arts Instructor Trainers with the Advanced Infantry Training Battalion at School of Infantry (East), Camp Geiger, N.C. In between the hours spent at their physically exhausting work, which begins as early as five in the morning and often goes until dark, they train and prepare themselves for their demanding past time – participation in mixed martial arts tournaments. (continue reading…)
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Inspecting for Sharp Minds and Bodies

Thirteen weeks have passed for the young men of 1st Battalion, Company B first stepped onto the yellow footprints of Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego.  From day one, these young men have been under the watchful eyes of their drill instructors being challenged physically and mentally every day.

Since first meeting their drill instructors, Company B has trained virtually non-stop.  They have learned close-order drill, hand-to-hand combat, rifle marksmanship, and the history of the Corps.  However, the drill instructors have also passed on the meaning of the Corps’ values of honor, courage and commitment.

One major test is the Crucible, this 54-hour training evolution where the recruits are put into a combat-simulated environment with rationed food and very little sleep, tests all the physical training the recruits have received and their ability to accomplish tasks in a high stress environment.

After the completion of the Crucible, the young men receive their eagle, globe and anchor and are called Marines for the first time.  Though the new Marines have finally earned their emblem they still have to pass the Battalion Commander’s Inspection. (continue reading…)

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Drill Instructor Into Extreme Sports

Growing up in Pismo Beach, Calif., a drill instructor spent countless hours hitting the slopes on his snow board. But with the need for adrenaline coursing through his veins, the drill instructor wanted to test the excitement of other extreme sports.

After Staff Sgt. Heath A. Gomez, senior drill instructor, Platoon 2122, Company F, became a Marine, he remembered the time he spend in the mountains snowboarding and began surfing, riding dirt bikes and cycling.

His horizons broadened when his brother-in-law, a student at San Diego State University, asked him if he wanted to go surfing with him one morning. Gomez figured the water would be a lot warmer in San Diego than it was at Pismo Beach, so he opted to give it a try.

Although snowboarding and surfing have similarities, surfing didn’t come easy for Gomez.

“Both snowboarding and surfing are a balancing game and a test of good coordination,” said Gomez.

It took him a couple of weeks before he caught my first wave. When he stood up for the first time, he felt exhilarated because he was gliding on water, he said.

It’s that feeling when he caught that wave that kept him going back for more. (continue reading…)

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Recruits Prepare for Combat

The Table 2 Basic Combat Marksmanship Course is the first step in transitioning a Marine from fundamental marksmanship to becoming a proficient combat marksman.

During Field Week, the second three-week phase of recruit training, Company F recruits completed the Table 2 Basic Combat  Marksmanship Course at Edson Range, Camp Pendleton, Calif., Dec. 3.

“Table 2 prepares the recruits for combat by teaching them the fundamentals of marksmanship with a combat load and aiming at close distances,” said Sgt. Juan J. Solando, line staff non-commissioned officer, Alpha Range, Weapons and Field Training Battalion. (continue reading…)

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Meat Tags

The BBC recently did an news story on the use of Meat Tags within the USMC.

It is a grim reminder of the cost of war. But for marines based at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, getting a meat tag – a tattooed copy of their vital information inked into their skin – means paying a visit to Jesse Mays before they head off to war.
“They’re used to identify a corpse. They’re not for the living.”
Jesse Mays is sitting on a stool in what he calls his “operating room” – a small room next to a vault. This building used to be a bank, he says. The heavy round vault door sits open, now filled with filing cabinets and canvases.
Lying shirtless on the black leather table next to him is Gunnery Sergeant Mike “Gunny” Greer, one arm raised over his head. Spiked restraints hang from the sides of the table. Jesse laughs and says they are just for fun, “unless you fidget too much.”
Jesse Mays has done over 30,000 tattoos in his career
The Sleeping Dragon Tattoo Parlor is in the small town of Jacksonville, just outside Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base. Inside the Dragon, as Jesse calls it, Bob Marley is both on the stereo and on the walls.

BBC (continue reading…)

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Conquering the Obstacle Course

Recruits from Company E kicked up clouds of dust as they ran in place, getting pumped to take on the depot Obstacle Course for the second time during their training, May 15.

“This is their first O-Course since first phase,” said Staff Sgt. Christopher Galvan, senior drill instructor, Platoon 2111, Company E.

This time around they were to run it as a fire team, of four men. Two men move at a time to create a staggered movement, so there is always cover provided. (continue reading…)

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Basic Warrior Training

Painful – that was the one word used by recruits to describe their time during the Day Walk Course of Basic Warrior Training Nov. 6.

The day walk is just one portion of Basic Warrior Training, but it keeps recruits heaving for breath and aching in every possible way.

“It was more like the boot camp I was expecting,” said Rct. Justis Beaureguard of 2nd Recruit Training Battalion’s Golf Company, Platoon 2109. “It was painful.”

It all started before the sun was ever up.

Cutting through the woods and traveling in circle after circle, the recruits finally arrived at the Day Walk Course at 6:30 a.m.

“I thought the course would be easier,” said Rct. James Ryan of Golf Company’s Platoon 2109. “But it was hard.”

Before starting, the recruits were given a brief demonstration of the course by the staff (continue reading…)

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U.S. Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test Requirements

Background:

The United States Marine Corps requires that all Marines perform a Physical Fitness Test (PFT) and a Combat Fitness Test (CFT) once per fiscal year. Each test must have an interval of 6 months (same standards apply for reservists). The PFT ensures that Marines are keeping physically fit and in a state of physical readiness. It consists of pull-ups, crunches and a 3-mile run for males. For females it consists of flexed arm hang, crunches and a 3-mile run.
1 October 2008, the Marine Corps introduced the additional pass/fail Combat Fitness Test (CFT) to the fitness requirements. The CFT is designed to measure abilities demanded of Marines in a war zone

The United States Marine Corps requires that all Marines perform a Physical Fitness Test (PFT) and a Combat Fitness Test (CFT) once per fiscal year. Each test must have an interval of 6 months (same standards apply for reservists). The PFT ensures that Marines are keeping physically fit and in a state of physical readiness. It consists of pull-ups, crunches and a 3-mile run for males. For females it consists of flexed arm hang, crunches and a 3-mile run.1 October 2008, the Marine Corps introduced the additional pass/fail Combat Fitness Test (CFT) to the fitness requirements. The CFT is designed to measure abilities demanded of Marines in a war zone (continue reading…)

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Fear of Heights

With nearly three months of recruit training under their belts, the recruits of Company G have conquered many fears and challenges that they never thought were possible. They have qualified with a rifle, swam in a full combat load and endured grueling physical fitness sessions. With only a couple weeks remaining in boot camp, the recruits are given a task to complete that reaches new levels of fear: the rappel tower.

The day consists of hours of lecture, where recruits learn the proper techniques for rappelling as well as how to create the safety harness that will hold them securely when rappelling. The harness is made using a six-foot rope that is wrapped around the legs and hips and secured by a series of square knots.

Before stepping foot on the tower, recruits are issued the respective safety gear prior to the training evolution. With the assistance of a tactical helmet, gloves, ropes, carabiner and a spotter, recruits make their descent safely to the ground.

“The rappel tower gives these recruits chance to let go of any lasting fears and build their confidence,” Staff Sgt. Nathan Stocking, Platoon 2146, Company G. “At first they seem nervous and shy, but if they just focus on the technique they are taught, they will be fine. Rappel is a simple concept.” (continue reading…)

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Poolees Get Marksmanship Training

Blue skies, birds chirping and a cool breeze may be an ideal morning for most people, but add in the smell of gun powder and the crack of a hammer hitting a primer and sending rounds down range is what perks up most Marines.

On recruiting duty, Marines are exempt from attending the rifle range, but for Recruiting Station Milwaukee that does not mean poolees are not offered the opportunity to learn basic Marine Corps marksmanship and gain some familiarity firing the civilian version of the M-16A2 service rifle, the AR-15.

Nine of the 13 recruiting substations with RS Milwaukee each received half a day of marksmanship training, live fire, cover and concealment classes, M240B Medium machine gun familiarization, a partial Initial Strength Test and a Meal Ready to Eat lunch at Stone Bank Sportman’s Club between August 4-7. (continue reading…)

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Family values encourage new Marine to improve quality of life

When thinking about a question he has just been asked about his life Pfc. Duy Trinh takes a moment to reflect on the answer and also about how it may sound.

“I was born in Saigon, Vietnam,” said Trinh through broken English.  Something in the way he pauses shows in his as eyes, as if the 20 year old goes back to his birthplace and through all his memories that brought him to this exact moment in his life. “My grandparents fled after the Vietnam (conflict), and all my relatives split up after that, some came to the states.”

Born as the only child to a construction worker and a housewife, Trinh dreamed of growing up to be an engineer, but when his parents decided to move to Garden Grove, Calif. in 2004 the young man focused on lear

ning to speak English and finishing school.

“I started (American) high school with only three months left of my freshman year,” said the Bolsa Grande High School alumni “Mr. Bridges was a (English as a Second Language) teacher, he helped me a lot.  I liked him because he was an instructor first but was very careful in the way he actually listened to me.”

Trinh learned that his teacher was a former active duty Marine and heeded his advice when it came to learning and has carried the guidance with him ever since.

“He always told me ‘Your books are your weapon, like a rifle to a Marine.  Every time you come to school your books are (continue reading…)

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Teacher becomes Marine

Former teacher, Pfc. Patrick Collman, Platoon 2109, Company E, had the option to go to Officer Candidate School because he had a bachelor’s degree, but chose to enlist instead, for the challenge. He wanted to start from the bottom and work his way up, as he has demonstrated in virtually every aspect of his life leading to boot camp.

“That way, if you do get into a higher position you know

what the lower positions are going through,” Collman said.

Having grown up in the mountains of Colorado, Collman loved the outdoors, and as a result, became a Boy Scout, then attained the rank of Eagle Scout during his senior year of high school.

But before Collman could lead scouts, he had to start somewhere. Just as Marines start as recruits, Boy Scouts must go through the ranks and start as Cub Scouts. (continue reading…)

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United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects
This manual contains information on all the essential subjects and provides a condensed, readily available study aid to supplement more detailed information contained in the Fleet Marine Force Manual, The Guidebook for Marines, and other sources. The primary target audience of this publication is intelligence personnel responsible for the planning and execution of CI operations. (continue reading…)
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MCWP 2-6 Counterintelligence

MCWP 2-6 Counterintelligence

MCWP 2-6 Counterintelligence – File 1
This document provides the doctrine and higher order tactics, techniques, and procedures for intelligence operations. MCWP 2-14, Counterintelligence, complements and expands on this information by detailing doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures for the conduct of counterintelligence (CI) operations in support of the Marine airground task force (MAGTF).

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