U.S. Marines – United States Marine Corps

NLW Multiservice Procedures for the Tactical Employment of Nonlethal Weapons

NLW Multiservice Procedures for the Tactical Employment of Nonlethal Weapons

NLW Multiservice Procedures for the Tactical Employment of Nonlethal Weapons – File 1
This publication describes multiservice tactics, techniques, and procedures (MTTP) for consideration and use during the tactical employment of nonlethal weapons (NLW) in support of warfighting personnel conducting training and tactical operations.

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MCO-1510.32D Individual Training Standards for Recruits

MCO-1510.32D Individual Training Standards for Recruits

MCO-1510.32D Individual Training Standards for Recruits – File 1
This file is an order that provides policies and instructions for the conduct of recruit training. References (a) and (b) apply to all Marines and describe entry-level indoctrination and skills common to all.

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MCI 7510B Marine Corps Institute Tactical Fundamentals

MCI 7510B Marine Corps Institute Tactical Fundamentals
This manual provides a general knowledge of offensive and defensive tactics at the infantry battalion level. It includes troop-leading procedures, selective portions of a plan of attack and defense, tactical control measures, principles of war, principles of security and reconnaissance, and communications. (continue reading…)

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NAVMC 2691 Marine Corps Drill and Ceremonies Manual

NAVMC 2691 Marine Corps Drill and Ceremonies Manual
This manual furnishes information and describes procedures for close order drill and military ceremonies within the Marine Corps. It encompasses detailed procedures for all drills and ceremonies executed by troop elements ranging in size from the individual to the regiment. (continue reading…)

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FMFRP 0-1B Marine Physical Readiness Training for Combat

FMFRP 0-1B Marine Physical Readiness Training for Combat
This manual is intended for use by all Marines. It provides the information and references necessary to establish and conduct physical conditioning programs to prepare Marines for the physical demands of combat. (continue reading…)

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FMFRP 0-13 Marine Combat Water Survival

FMFRP 0-13 Marine Combat Water Survival
This manual provides techniques, procedures, and training standards for Marine water survival. This publication addresses a Marine’s ability to cross water obstacles and perform water rescues. It guides individual Marines and small-unit leaders in the proper techniques and training requirements of combat water survival. The publication addresses topics such as drowning, hypothermia, water rescues, water survival, natural water obstacles, and fording. (continue reading…)

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FMFM 8-4 Doctrine for Riverine Operations

FMFM 8-4 Doctrine for Riverine Operations

FMFM 8-4 Doctrine for Riverine Operations – File 1
This manual sets forth doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures to be employed by operating forces of the Marine Corps when conducting, or training for, operations in a riverine environment. Also discussed are the classification of riverine environments, concepts of operation, employment of combat, combat support, combat service support units, and information on usable craft and vehicles.

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FMFM 8-2 Counterinsurgency Operations

FMFM 8-2 Counterinsurgency Operations

FMFM 8-2 Counterinsurgency Operations – File 1
This manual presents the doctrine, tactics, and techniques used by Marine Corps landing forces in counterinsurgency operations, including counterguerrilla operations. The manual is written in two parts. Part I provides essential background information concerning the origina and general objectives of counterinsurgency operations as well as the tactics and techniques employed by insurgency forces. Part II sets forth Marine Corps doctrine, tactics, and techniques for counterinsurgency operations, with emphasis on the planning and conduct of internal defense assistance operations by Marine Corps forces.

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FMFM 7-32 Raid Operations

FMFM 7-32 Raid Operations
This manual explains doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures (DTTP) for raid operations conducted by Marine Air-Ground Task Forces (MAGTFs). It highlights the advantages, disadvantages, and other critical factors every commander and staff member must consider during planning and execution of a raid operation. (continue reading…)

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FMFM 6-7 Scouting and Patrolling for Infantry Units

FMFM 6-7 Scouting and Patrolling for Infantry Units

FMFM 6-7 Scouting and Patrolling for Infantry Units – File 1
This manual provides guidance to the individual Marine and Marine leaders from the fire team to the company level on scouting techniques and effective employment of Marines and Marine infantry units. Although the information is focused on infantry units rather than reconnaissance units, much of the information is applicable to reconnaissance units as well as combat service support and aviation units operating in the MAGTF rear area.

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FMFM 6-4 Marine Rifle Company/Platoon

FMFM 6-4 Marine Rifle Company/Platoon
This manual sets forth doctrine, tactics, and techniques for operations and training conducted by Marine rifle companies and platoons. Information includes amphibious operations, helicopter-borne operations, offensive combat, defensive combat, patrolling, auxiliary operations, and counterinsurgency operations. (continue reading…)

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FMFM 5-3 Assault Support

FMFM 5-3 Assault Support

FMFM 5-3 Assault Support ? File 1
This manual sets forth doctrine, tactics, and techniques to be employed in operations and training involving aviation assault support within the Fleet Marine Force. This manual also expands the doctrine, tactics, and techniques applicable to the employment of the assault transport function of Marine aviation contained in FMFM 5-1, Marine Aviation.

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FMFM 4-4 Engineer Operations

FMFM 4-4 Engineer Operations

FMFM 4-4 Engineer Operations ? File 1
This manual sets forth the doctrine, tactics, and techniques to be employed in engineer operations and training within the Fleet Marine Forces. It covers the mission, organization, and principles of employment of engineer units in support of Fleet Marine Forces in amphibious operations and subsequent operations ashore.

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FMFM 3-3 Helicopterborne Operations

FMFM 3-3 Helicopterborne Operations

FMFM 3-3 Helicopterborne Operations  File 1
This manual sets forth the doctrine, tactics, and techniques to be employed in helicopterborne operations and training within the Fleet Marine Forces. This manual also covers the organization and principles of employment of helicopter and helicopterborne units.

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FMFM 2-1 Intelligence

FMFM 2-1 Intelligence
This manual sets forth information and guidance concerning the planning and execution of intelligence activities within the Marine Corps. It addresses intelligence staff organizations, functions, and responsibilities, including the direction, collection, processing, and dissemination of intelligence. (continue reading…)

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FMFM 1-1 Campaigning

FMFM 1-1 Campaigning

FMFM 1-1 Campaigning ? File 1
This manual is about military campaigning. A campaign is a series of related military actions undertaken over a period of time to achieve a specific objective within a given region.

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FMFM 1 Warfighting

FMFM 1 Warfighting

FMFM 1 Warfighting  File 1

To understand the Marine Corps’ philosophy of warfighting, we first need an appreciation for the nature of war itself?its moral and physical characteristics and demands. A common view among Marines of the nature of war is a necessary base for the development of a cohesive doctrine. This manual provides the authoritative basis for how Marines fight and how they prepare to fight.
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Why Do Marines Drill?

Gunnery Sgt. Michael S. Pevehouse takes his hat off to his platoon  after they successfully completed a difficult drill maneuver.

Gunnery Sgt. Michael S. Pevehouse takes his hat off to his platoon after they successfully completed a difficult drill maneuver.

Why do Marines drill?

There are perhaps no other services in the world more proud of their service than Marines.

Just ask them.

They have their own language, sharp uniforms and snazzy commercials. Before equality became formality in the U.S. armed forces, they developed catchy slogans that clued in on how separate they viewed themselves.

�A few good men.�

�The few, the proud, the Marines.�

Marines like to look good and want everyone to take notice. Even when they walk together in groups.

A civilian would call it marching. They call it drill.

When a Marine begins his first days at boot camp, he is taught everything all over again. As if his parents did not do a good job of teaching him to walk, talk, cloth, and feed himself, his new daddy is quick to provide instruction.

Perhaps none of the above instructions are more important than drill.

At first, Marines are filed into platoon formations, looking like green eggs staked neatly in a carton. They begin to master the �box.� Then they �slime� their way around the depot; a gaggle of geese ditty bopping to the familiar sounds of their drill instructor�s voice. Eventually they are taught the simpler drill movements: Position of attention, saluting, left and right faces.

Perhaps the most important is putting their feet in front of the other in unison. This might sound like a hard thing to do, but when there are 50 or more people trying to be on the same page, things get complicated.

The  setting sun is the only thing that really stops drill upon the depot.  From dawn to dusk, Marines practice drill on all grinders.

The setting sun is the only thing that really stops drill upon the depot. From dawn to dusk, Marines practice drill on all grinders.

Evolution of footwear is also an important step to understanding Marine drill.

Marines are first required to wear sneakers with their camouflaged utilities. Here the basic drill movements are repeated until Marine have a fair understanding of what are basic drill movements. Their pant legs are rolled down and cuffed like a kindergartner wearing his older brother�s jeans.

But then they are issued combat boots. This is like handing a drummer a set of really good sticks. They roll their trousers over their boots and blouse them with green elastic cords. Now the young Marines have reached a new goal. Now the Marines are expected to bring what drill instructors call �thunder.�

After long days under the grueling heat and sand fleas of Paris Island or roaring jet engines of a nearby airport of San Diego, the recruits have grasped the understanding of drill. While they might not be masters, they do gain confidence and discipline through a memorized routine.

What the Marines like to call �instant obedience to orders.�

Sgt. Luis A. Mercado demonstrates the proper technique on marching  with a rifle to his platoon.

Sgt. Luis A. Mercado demonstrates the proper technique on marching with a rifle to his platoon.

It is through drill that Marines at any rank can go back to the basics. A junior Marine leading a platoon formation is something to be admired in the Corps when a senior Marine is expected.

Drill is used as confidence builder in this instance. Much like civilians with a fear of public speaking, putting a young Marine in front of a platoon of his peers can be slightly uncomfortable. They mumble or stutter their commands, loose focus, and generally do a bad job. Any resemblance of the confident Marine on the boot camp grinder is gone. After some remedial instruction, and egging on by the drill�ees, the young Marine gains confidence. Soon, he�s barking orders and singing cadence like a hard-nosed, barreled-chested, square-jawed drill instructor. Like a Marine.

And is this why Marines drill.

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What are the legal requirements to joining the Marines?

I am not a citizen of the United States, but I would still like to be in the Marines. Is this possible?
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You can join the Marines when you reach 17 years of age, and also upon entering your senior year in high school, as long as you have your parents’ consent.
In most cases you must be a United States citizen or resident alien to join the Marines. Upon establishing permanent legal residence in the U.S., you should address specific questions regarding your enlistment to your local Marine Corps recruiter.
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Is Recruit Training hard?

Yes. Recruit Training will be one of the most physically and mentally challenging experiences of your life. But it is not impossible. The sense of accomplishment upon completing training is very rewarding and worthwhile.

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