U.S. Marines – United States Marine Corps

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects
This manual contains information on all the essential subjects and provides a condensed, readily available study aid to supplement more detailed information contained in the Fleet Marine Force Manual, The Guidebook for Marines, and other sources. The primary target audience of this publication is intelligence personnel responsible for the planning and execution of CI operations.

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects – File 1
This manual contains information on all the essential subjects and provides a condensed, readily available study aid to supplement more detailed information contained in the Fleet Marine Force Manual, The Guidebook for Marines, and other sources. This file is the United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects manual cover.

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects – File 2
This manual contains information on all the essential subjects and provides a condensed, readily available study aid to supplement more detailed information contained in the Fleet Marine Force Manual, The Guidebook for Marines, and other sources. This file contains the “Contents” page and “Chapter 1 – Code of Conduct, Military Law/UCMJ, and Conduct in War” through “Chapter 3 – Close Order Drill, Section IV – Execution of Drill Movements.”

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects – File 3
This manual contains information on all the essential subjects and provides a condensed, readily available study aid to supplement more detailed information contained in the Fleet Marine Force Manual, The Guidebook for Marines, and other sources. This file contains “Chapter 4 – Interior Guard, Section I – The Eleven General Orders” through “Chapter 5 – First Aid and Field Sanitation, Section II – Field Sanitation.”

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects – File 4
This manual contains information on all the essential subjects and provides a condensed, readily available study aid to supplement more detailed information contained in the Fleet Marine Force Manual, The Guidebook for Marines, and other sources. This file contains “Chapter 6 – Uniform Clothing and Equipment, Section I – Marking of Clothing” through “Section V – Wearing and Maintaining Uniforms and Equipment.”

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects – File 5
This manual contains information on all the essential subjects and provides a condensed, readily available study aid to supplement more detailed information contained in the Fleet Marine Force Manual, The Guidebook for Marines, and other sources. This file contains “Chapter 7 – Physical Fitness” through “Chapter 9 – Service Rifle and Marksmanship, Section VI – Rifle Qualification.”

United States Marine Guidebook of Essential Subjects – File 6
This manual contains information on all the essential subjects and provides a condensed, readily available study aid to supplement more detailed information contained in the Fleet Marine Force Manual, The Guidebook for Marines, and other sources. This file contains “Chapter 10 – Individual Tactical Measures, Section I – Squad in the Defense” through “Chapter 13 – Land Navigation, Section III – Land Navigation by Dead-Reckoning.”


12 Comments for this entry

  • mathew embrey

    I do not know if I am checking the wrong place, but you guys should really consider leaving a training guide for recruites on your website. It would really help for prepairing for recruit training.

    • GJ Babin USMCV-DAV

      If the manual were published, you still would not comprehend what is in it until you arrived at boot camp any way. You as a civilian can not comprehend the commitment and bond “Dumb Recruits” learn by not knowing. To “Pre-educate would increase training time in order to re educate those with advanced knowledge who have become “Experts” before passing thru the fire.

      • W. Bentley, USMCR (Ret)

        G.J. Babin, granted, from a few years ago, but a rather harsh comment. I went to boot camp knowing a LOT more than many of my fellow recruits. Beyond Full Metal Jacket (which came out the month before I enlisted…so, yes, a little concerned about that…when I discussed that with R. Lee Ermey in the KC Airport one day about 10 years ago while we were both waiting for our bags to come out on the carousel, he told me the USMC almost didn’t put the stamp of approval on the movie not because of the graphic scenes, but because of the feared effect upon recruiting!), I had spent a year in the DEP and the recruiters had taught us many things which would be useful, and were doctrinally correct for the time. And I had spent my childhood reading voraciously about military history, so I could easily cite relevant facts about many Armed Services, from many eras, from many nations, and compare and contrast, discuss strategy and tactics, failed campaigns (and why), the names of relevant Operations like Overlord, Gallipoli, Dieppe, Derna, Torch, War Plan Orange, etc.

        This was, of course, very helpful in boot camp because I didn’t have to waste my sleeping hours memorizing rote materials like the General Orders, Code of Conduct, relevant Articles of the UCMJ, names of chain of command, organization of the USMC as prescribed by Title 10, etc…

        It also allowed me to spend my extra time helping my fellow recruits understand things when they were a little slow, or simply fatigued by having to spend their sleeping hours memorizing BS they should have already known before arrival.

        As a “Knowledge Private” or “Prac Master,” my DI’s despised that I often knew more than them about some things: my punishment was to spend all my waking hours tutoring others and taking the blame when they failed to make the grade…

        I became very good at incentive training in the Pits.

        But I would be the first to say that the more knowledge available, the better.

        Poolees are members of the Marine Corps Reserve from the day they swear the Oath of Enlistment to the day they ship to Boot Camp and enter active duty. Or if they are going to stay in the reserves, they of course they are just transferring from the Individual Ready Reserve sub-category to the Selected Reserve sub-category of the Ready Reserve category of the Reserve Component.

        Poolees no longer receive any TIS or TIG credit, nor credit toward pay or retirement, but they ARE members of the Marine Corps, by law. And we, as an institution, should take every possible opportunity to educate and train them before they arrive at boot camp, where we take those who are merely “in the Marine Corps,” and make them into Marines.

        28 years of service, about 25 of it active, as both officer and enlisted, Active Component and Reserve Component. “Working smarter, not harder.”

        Semper fi,
        W. Bentley
        LtCol
        Retired

    • Raymond Anderson

      All I had under my belt, was a memorization of the movie “The D.I.” -that and 10 years of baby sitting responsibility drilled into me. See review below.

      http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050283/

      Inactive duty Marine of 12 honorable years.

  • Michael

    It appears that we’ve forgotten about what these sub-human’s have done to us.

    Here’s a reminder: http://www.endtimestoday.com/2009/06/26/american-nick-bergs-beheading-warning-graphic-images/

  • Neal Baker

    I stumbled across this manual. My father was a US Marine and I can see a lot of his common sense and decency is echoed in decorum suggested in this manual.

  • Fmr. Lcpl

    He should run his liberal mouth to a Marine is person. But we all know he’s a nerd behind a mac eating ramen in his parents basement

    • Terrence L. Gabriel

      To: Fmr. Lcpl – I served as a Fleet Marine in the 60s during the little dustup in Vietnam. Have all the medals and badges. Survived a few months short of 3 years in-country as a radio operator in 7th Marines, 5th Marines, 9th Marines, the Korean Marines, and finally the Combined Action Program.

      Not sure who you are asking to “run his liberal mouth to a Marine in person” but be careful who you stereotype, Lance Corporal.

      I am as Liberal as they come, having voted Democratic for 48 years. Also, I have a Mac. But to be clear, my political beliefs are earned by experiencing the world for over 70 years. A silly remark from a Lance Corporal is worth spit.

      Terrence L. Gabriel
      Sergeant, USMC
      1966 – 1970

  • Corin

    Wow. Sensing some hostility here in the comments section.

    I’ve had the honor of knowing many military servicemen (and women), and for the most part, they were all honorable and ethical people. I’ve been proud to call myself an American and a veteran my whole life. And while I wasn’t a Marine, I’ve read a number of their manuals and found very helpful, and insightful, information therein.

    Freedom Isn’t Free – People need to realize this and appreciate those who serve.

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